Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn NYC’

It’s undeniable that Hip Hop [used as a tool to effect social change] has become a globally accepted culture. Beginning in The Bronx – New York City and making its way to the furthest corners of the Earth, a multitude of ethnicities/cultures that are supported by varying and opposing religious ideals are likely to have derived a respective iteration of Hip Hop while strictly adhering to the culture’s core principals. This is especially true for Kampala, Uganda – Africa based Kulture Future Kids (K.F.K.) – a Universal Zulu Nation supported local organization that looks to teach and inspire the youth of Uganda by using Hip Hop’s celebrated values and elements.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the organizers of the K.F.K. program to discuss life in Uganda, the intent of their community based social initiative, and the country’s local Hip Hop scene. And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner welcomes his older, Corey Turner, Esq. to the TCOHHL experience and together they kick it with celebrated DJ, Music Producer, Documentarian, Hip Hop purveyor/protector, and Host of the Fran Lover Show, Fran Lover. With a relationship that goes back more than 30 years [with origins firmly planted in the Linden Housing development located in the East New York section of Brooklyn – NYC], the discussion unfolds in a manner that proves familiar, insightful, nostalgic, and entertaining.

And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say we appropriately explore Hip Hop’s Rap music timeline through an unfiltered and undisturbed East New York lens.

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Click below to hear the episode.

Hit us up!

@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com/
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Can you recall the moment when you realized that Hip Hop’s sound and look was multi-dimensional? In pondering an answer to this question, our collective recollection as Hip Hop supporters would naturally transport us back to 1988 to engage memories of the endearing Native Tongue movement (Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Jungle Brothers, Black Sheep, Queen Latifah, Monie Love, Kool DJ Red Alert, Chi-Ali, and the Fu-Schnickens) and such an engagement would be undeniably correct. But in 1992, Hip Hop’s music would experience an infusion to its already present and unapologetically expressed consciousness. As supporters, we’d have the good fortune of being introduced to a new sound, spirit, and aestheticism that we had yet to experience up until that point. And the provider of this experience you ask? Arrested Development and their debut release, ‘3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days In The Life Of…

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Arrested Development is legendary. During a time when Hip Hop’s Rap music was already at its multi-dimensional peak, A.D. [Arrested Development] further pushed the music’s boundaries, thereby, creating another realm where the culture could thrive amidst the music business’s time and space construct. Arrested Development effectively reinforced the understanding that gaining and maintaining Knowledge of Self wasn’t the singular responsibility of Black culture; the duty was to also be proud of who we are while upholding an ever-present sense of integrity that is warranted by our African lineage. Additionally, through their soulfully conscious concoctions of melody, A.D. forced us to challenge popular perspective and engage individual thought and perception. After hearing ‘Mr. Wendal,’ how many of you found yourself driven by the inclination to engage a homeless person in dialogue? I did and found the conversation to be extremely enlightening and impactful. From ‘Everyday People’ to ‘Tennessee’ to ‘Revolution’ to Speech’s Hip Hop Proclamation, ‘Can U Hear Me,’ back to the positive cultural assertions that ‘Natural Hair’ imparted to some of the group’s current releases like, ‘Follow That,’ and ‘Weight (Off My Back),’ Arrested Development has always been endowed with a capability of authoring music that connects with the consciousness of humanity without sacrificing Hip Hop’s Boom-Bap signature.

This Wednesday on March 2nd, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio kicks it with Speech, Founder and Front-Man of the legendary Arrested Development collective. With Speech, we discuss growing up in Milwaukee and Tennessee, the formation of Arrested Development, cultural awareness, their new projects, and a host of other topics.

By: D.D. Turner , Founder/Executive Producer/Host – TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard

Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard

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**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird. Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview on March 2nd. And while you’re there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.

How do you celebrate the life and legacy of, Sean Price? In a public forum, preferably one that is broadcasted, you invite his brother and arguably the person, following his immediate family, that knew him best. That would be, the Rock[ness] Monstah (most commonly known by true Hip Hop heads as, ‘Rock’) from one of Hip Hop’s most notable and quotable premier lyrical tag-teams, Heltah Skeltah.

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Next Wednesday, February 17th, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio kicks it with the Rockness Monstah. From life in Brooklyn to his brotherhood with the legendary, Sean Price, to his perspective on the current state of lyricism and music, Rock gives us an interview and discussion that is sure to keep you thoroughly enthralled. As well as, new music that will undoubtedly get you excited about the “Buck-Town” legend’s upcoming project(s).

You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird. Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview. And while you’re there, hit the “Follow” button.

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio

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Art, regardless of the medium, is subjective. When engaging art, individual interpretation affords us the opportunity to derive our own context regarding the inspiration and intent behind the work. Following this reasoning, one can appropriately deduce that, fundamentally Hip Hop provides the canvas of expression and the interpretive standards to which we adhere for the purpose of making a connection with its masterpieces. From Rap music to Graffiti to the pursuit of knowledge through education [institutional or otherwise], those of us that regard the culture’s elements as regular functions of our day-to-day lives generally do so in a manner that fits perfectly into the framework of our own individualism.

Introducing, Dan Lish; a consummate example of the aforementioned and a certified endorser of Hip Hop culture. As a talented visual artist and an ardent supporter of Hip Hop, Dan has proven that a place of mutuality can exist between two disciplines and the regular hampering of inhibition can be achieved when creativity and passion are always prioritized.

Real talk…Dan’s work is f@%king outstanding! Albeit a result of his individualism, Dan’s ability to visually interpret song content and the persona of some of Hip Hop’s most revered legends is inspiring, thought provoking, and surely endowed with the capacity to beckon intelligent and perspective driven Hip Hop conversation. To study his work is to submit to a realm of wonderment; forcing escapism to a magical destination where the cost of admission is limited to the mere engagement of subjectivity by one’s own interpretation. His choice of subtle colors and illustrative processes makes for a style that is completely his own; it allows those that indulge his masterpieces to not be lost in the over-saturation and blinding hues of bright colors. But instead, you find yourself swept away by Dan’s exertion of identified symbolism and its ability to portray the genius, iconic nature, and perhaps the interpreted innocence of our beloved Hip Hop legends.

Hip Hop has grown and its maturity is a mirror reflection of the intellect, skill, and creativity that it has fostered in us as its supporters. Consistently, Dan Lish provides evidence of this by allowing the synergy that exists between his life gift of intellect, skill, and creativity and his passion for Hip Hop in an effort to widen the culture’s perspective and further its social appeal and global relevance.

Visit http://www.egotripland.com/artist-dan-lish/ and http://danlish.com to see Dan’s artwork. Also, stay tuned for the upcoming “Dan Lish Episode” on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio (http://mixcloud.com/TCOHHL_Radio).

-D.D. Turner, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend)

@TCOHHL_Radio – Twitter

@hiphops_wizard – Instagram

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If asked, how would you define the term, “Revolutionary But Gangster?” Our definition? One whom willingly assumes the responsibility of being the catalyst for social change while leveraging their hood sensibilities for the purpose of maintaining a connection with the people that they represent.

If our definition is with merit, then this was Tupac. This is KRS One. This is Public Enemy. This is Paris. This is Tragedy Khadafi. This is Immortal Technique. This is Kendrick Lamar. This is Brother J. This is Talib Kweli, Brother Ali, and Common. And this most certainly is Dead Prez.

Tomorrow on The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) Radio, the dynamic duo, D.D. Turner and C. Stats, will be hosting M1 of Dead Prez. What are we discussing? From the roots of Dead Prez to their current projects, we’re covering it all. And the playlist you ask? It’s all about Dead Prez!

So tune in tomorrow (Wednesday) from 8-10pm est on tenacityradio.com.

Don’t fake jacks by being a #TurdBird! Tune in and officially be Down By Law with #TCOHHL, #DeadPrez, and the #RBG Movement. #WordBorn!

On the go? Then tune in to the live show via our mobile app using the following link:

http://tenacityradio.mobapp.at/#listen-live/Listen_Live

Or, perhaps you’re interested in catching up on our past shows. Then check out the show archives by visiting this link.

http://mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio

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I am a certified, bonified, and qualified East New York – Brooklyn, New York City representative. Hell, without ever appearing obsessive and overbearing, I make it known whenever appropriate. And concerning my birthplace, I’ve never pulled any punches while amidst any conversations that call for the recognition of my hometown. I am exceedingly proud!

But at some point, we all perhaps find ourselves confronted with the wonderment of being from elsewhere; a rightful representative of a place that brimms with an undeniable flyness,  mystique, and culture. Offering full disclosure of my own wonderment of elsewhere, California, Los Angeles’, City of Compton, has always been on my list. And after seeing the NWA biopic, Straight Outta Compton, it has absolutely become my #1 pick.

I am an inner-city born and bred child of the 70s, 80s, and early 90s. Hip Hop culture is undoubtedly 1 of the 4 vertices on the principled square upon which I firmly plant my B-boy stance; right over left.  Being in tune with the culture has afforded me several realizations, one being Hip Hop’s viability as a form of social activism and awareness.

Coming of age in Brooklyn during the Crack Era, and experiencing instances of police brutality and profiling, Niggaz Wit Attitudes’ (#NWA), Fuck The [Mother Fucking] Police, song was pivotal, and poignant to boot. This song [as well as other NWA songs], along with the group’s mere presence, reflected the sentiments of many and reasserted Hip Hop’s power while establishing the West Coast’s position amongst the culture’s collective of pioneering Emcees. The daftness of the group was remarkable and if you’ve ever questioned the group’s street creditability, the biopic, Straight Outta Compton, provides an exciting portrayal for that ass.

While the persona depictions primarily focus on the lives of Eric “Eazy-E” Wright, Andre “Dr. Dre” Young, and O’Shea “Ice Cube” Jackson, it doesn’t miss a beat with the cleverly interwoven yet less explored contributions of Lorenzo “MC Ren” Patterson, Antoine “DJ Yella” Carraby, and the arguably infamous, Jerry Heller; with strong respresentations of Suge Knight, Tupac, The D.O.C., and Snoop Dogg.

To the credit of the actors, their ability to capture and convey the qualities of the portrayed personas proved satisfying and informing. More than an entertaining undertaking, the project provided a history lesson that often goes untold and unexplored by those Hip Hop enthusiasts that were not raised on the West Coast. Suge Knight starting out as a bodyguard for the D.O.C; Dr. Dre relinquishing his publishing rights to make his exit from Deathrow Records; Ice Cube’s issues with Priority Records, and the fearlessness of Eazy-E, represent just a few widely known and speculated topics that the work explores.

In the end, I left the movie feeling both satisfied and proud. The pre-release hype of those of us that revelled in the idea of there being a cinematic depiction of one of Hip Hop’s most pivotal and courageous groups was well justified. This is a #TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) classic and comes highly recommended as an addition to your Hip Hop film library. -DDTurner, #TCOHHL

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Tonight on The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats take a trip back to 1988 with the Big Homie, Rack-Lo. Our discussion you ask? His journey, the origins of his world renowned flyness, the global influence of the Lo-Life Movement, popular Polo clothing themes, and equally as important, what he his currently working on.

Don’t fake jacks by being a #TurdBird! Tune in tonight, Wednesday, August 5th, and officially be Down By Law with #TCOHHL, #RackLo, and the historical #LoLifeMovement. And remember, #Love and #Loyalty always prevails. #WordIsBorn!

On the go? Then tune in to the live show via our mobile app using the link attached below.
http://tenacityradio.mobapp.at/#listen-live/Listen_Live

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Undoubtedly, consumership is important to the success of any brand; it suggests the acceptance by the consumer to allow the services and/or products of that brand to provide a convenience and/or enjoyment, on some level. But when the brand identifies a marketing strategy that speaks directly to the lifestyle of those that partake of its services, it addresses a slue of needs that often go overlooked. And in business, when the people are underserved, revenue is lost. But word-is-born, SPRITE GOT THE MEMO!

Sprite identified an opportunity to leverage some of Hip Hop music’s more poignant phrases by some of its more celebrated artists as a way to not only empower its consumers, but, to also publicly reaffirm the brands vested interest in Hip Hop culture. And while the Hip Hop conspiracy theorist may regard Sprite’s marketing tactic as insincere and as nothing more than a ploy to further degrade the diet of inner-city youth, I say to them very simply, “Then don’t drink the shit!”

Instead, celebrate the intent; view the cans as unique additions to your personal museum of cultural memorabilia. And in this instance consider an inclination to quell your ire for popular brand marketing; be the purveyor and not the naysayer.

In the end what is going to support the long-term sustainability of our beloved culture, is to revere it, support it, and love it as often as we can.
Sprite’s doing it. How about you? #ObeyYourVerse

Lastly…Is #Sprite angry with Drake?

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Were you a child of the 70’s and/or 80’s in NYC? Do you consider yourself a Ralph Lauren – Polo aficionado? Well, it’s likely that you didn’t arrive at this self imposed proclamation without receiving some level of influence from the likes of Rack-Lo and Thirstin Howl III (Vic-Lo); the undisputed architects of the “Love and Loyalty” inner-city mantra, the founders of the Brooklyn, NYC originated Lo-Life Movement, and arguably, the pioneers of Hip Hop’s contemporary fashion sense.

This week on The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats take a trip back to 1988 with the Big Homie, Rack-Lo. Our discussion you ask? His journey, the origins of his world renowned flyness, the global influence of the Lo-Life Movement, popular Polo clothing themes, and equally as important, what he his currently working on.

Don’t fake jacks by being a #TurdBird! Tune in on Wednesday, August 5th from 8-10pm est and officially be Down By Law with #TCOHHL, #RackLo, and the historical #LoLifeMovement. And remember, #Love and #Loyalty always prevails. #WordIsBorn!

Want to listen using your mobile device? Then tune in to the live show (Wednesday 8-10pm est) via our mobile app using the link attached below.

http://tenacityradio.mobapp.at/#listen-live/Listen_Live