Posts Tagged ‘Legends’

Art, regardless of the medium, is subjective. When engaging art, individual interpretation affords us the opportunity to derive our own context regarding the inspiration and intent behind the work. Following this reasoning, one can appropriately deduce that, fundamentally Hip Hop provides the canvas of expression and the interpretive standards to which we adhere for the purpose of making a connection with its masterpieces. From Rap music to Graffiti to the pursuit of knowledge through education [institutional or otherwise], those of us that regard the culture’s elements as regular functions of our day-to-day lives generally do so in a manner that fits perfectly into the framework of our own individualism.

Introducing, Dan Lish; a consummate example of the aforementioned and a certified endorser of Hip Hop culture. As a talented visual artist and an ardent supporter of Hip Hop, Dan has proven that a place of mutuality can exist between two disciplines and the regular hampering of inhibition can be achieved when creativity and passion are always prioritized.

Real talk…Dan’s work is f@%king outstanding! Albeit a result of his individualism, Dan’s ability to visually interpret song content and the persona of some of Hip Hop’s most revered legends is inspiring, thought provoking, and surely endowed with the capacity to beckon intelligent and perspective driven Hip Hop conversation. To study his work is to submit to a realm of wonderment; forcing escapism to a magical destination where the cost of admission is limited to the mere engagement of subjectivity by one’s own interpretation. His choice of subtle colors and illustrative processes makes for a style that is completely his own; it allows those that indulge his masterpieces to not be lost in the over-saturation and blinding hues of bright colors. But instead, you find yourself swept away by Dan’s exertion of identified symbolism and its ability to portray the genius, iconic nature, and perhaps the interpreted innocence of our beloved Hip Hop legends.

Hip Hop has grown and its maturity is a mirror reflection of the intellect, skill, and creativity that it has fostered in us as its supporters. Consistently, Dan Lish provides evidence of this by allowing the synergy that exists between his life gift of intellect, skill, and creativity and his passion for Hip Hop in an effort to widen the culture’s perspective and further its social appeal and global relevance.

Visit http://www.egotripland.com/artist-dan-lish/ and http://danlish.com to see Dan’s artwork. Also, stay tuned for the upcoming “Dan Lish Episode” on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio (http://mixcloud.com/TCOHHL_Radio).

-D.D. Turner, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend)

@TCOHHL_Radio – Twitter

@hiphops_wizard – Instagram

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I’ve recently had the opportunity to hear Macklemore and Ryan Lewis‘, Downtown; a multi-layered and bouncy banger that is complemented by the fast paced yet well enunciated flow of Macklemore. And if that’s not enough for the Hip Hop/Rap aficionado, the song features some of Hip Hop’s most celebrated legends; Kool Moe Dee [of The Treacherous 3], Grandmaster Caz [of The Cold Crush Brothers], and Grandmaster Melle Mel [of Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five].

Speaking honestly, up until my recent introduction to this song, compliments of my selective viewing of the 2015 MTV Video Music Awards, I’ve generally assumed a “Whatever” regard for the prowess of Macklemore; being a stark critic of lyricism while understanding that my subjective opinion is nothing more than personal perspective, I historically find myself only engaged by the careers of a few Emcees. But after my exposure to, Downtown, I suddenly find myself interested in Macklemore and Ryan Lewis and their trajectory into Hip Hop’s stratosphere and beyond. To know me, D.D. Turner, is to understand that my sudden interest in the duo has been precipitated by the groups willingness to pay homage to the legends by granting them the opportunity to be featured on a mainstream song.

To the Black Emcee/Rapper that didn’t find it necessary to grant a similar opportunity to our beloved legends, you should fuckin’ be ashamed of yourself! So often we hear the argument that Hip Hop culture, albeit universally accepted and celebrated, is ascribed to us as Black people and that it is only because of our permission, that others are able to partake of its concessions. Realizing the arguably extensive roots of Hip Hop culture, I consider this to be factual. However, being the fruit of such a legacy, today’s Black Rapper/Emcee that finds themself endowed with the fortune of mass appeal, has the responsibility of celebrating the legends in a manner that supercedes the mere occasional shoutout reference on a song, and provides the invitation of a feature, much like what Macklemore and Ryan Lewis have done for Kool Moe Dee, Grandmaster Caz, and Grandmaster Melle Mel.

Perhaps the graciousness of the Seattle Hip Hop duo will spark something in their fellow Emcees/Hip Hoppers, placing the realization of their own conscious or unconscious disregard for the lyrical legends before them. Bringing the expression of my perspective to an end, I find myself confronted with the very distinct feeling that we will now begin to see an increase in song appearances by our most celebrated and lyrically capable legends.

Shit! You all should have been doing this from jump.

By the way, Eric Nally…Dude, you’re destroying your knees!!

*Artists seeking guidance on a legendary Emcee capable of holding their own on a mainstream song feature, I bequeath the following list unto thee:

– Chuck D
– Rakim Allah
– KRS One
– Kool Herc
– Afrika Bambaataa
– King T
– Trigger Treach
– MC Lyte
– MC 8ight
– De La Soul
– Big Daddy Kane
– Special Ed
– Bone Thugs & Harmony
– Bahamadia
– Kool G Rap
– Lin Que
– Brother J
– Chubb Rock
– Wise Intelligent
– Everlast
– 3rd Bass
– Rob Base
– CL Smooth
– W.C.
– Jeru The Damaja
– AZ
– Mic Geronimo
– Sauce Money
– Tragedy Khadafi
– LL Cool J

By: D.D. Turner, #TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend)