Posts Tagged ‘#TCOHHL’

It’s no secret, to be successful in life employing strategy is imperative. More than proving to be a formidable tool against those inevitable obstacles, it offers organization amidst the ever-present chaos. For context, let’s consider the discipline of a chess strategist/player. The absence of emotion veils the calculations of the mind; that strategic design that is ultimately disclosed upon the surface of a mere checkered pattern with monarchical pieces. For all intents and purposes, the game of chess is life’s simulator. By way of opponent intent and the assessment of it, your willingness to enforce strategy supports self-sustainability, and if executed correctly, triumph over your worthy adversary. Just ask Maurice Ashley – chess strategist/aficionado and the first African American to receive the “Grandmaster” title from the World Chess Federation, FIDE (Fédération Internationale des Échecs).

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner, C. Stats, and DJ Jay St. Paul kick it with chess Grandmaster, Maurice Ashley. With him, the crew discusses his journey towards becoming a world renowned chess player, his effort to continue to increase the game’s exposure, and why everyone should consider the game and its inherent strategies as a tool to help navigate life’s obstacles.
And as usual, DJ Jay St. Paul entertains us with a mix that effectively highlights the game of chess’ reference in Hip Hop music. Click below to listen.

Hit us up!
@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
@ygb79 (Twitter)
@lyrik1979 (IG)
@TCOHHLRadio (Facebook)
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com/

Advertisements

A Mother’s love is immense. It is pleasantly unrelenting and as boundless and beautiful as a starry night Montana sky. In Hip Hop, we’ve experienced a Mother’s love; wonderfully displayed by those Mother’s that have suffered the untimely loss of their iconic son or daughter. Consider the late Afeni Shakur. Consider Volleta Wallace. Consider Maureen “Ma Dukes” Yancey.  And consider, Kathy Averill – Mother of lyrical titan, Eyedea. It’s been because of the fierce Motherly love of these Women that the legacies of their lyrically inclined, Hip Hop celebrated sons have sustained beyond their passing.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner, C. Stats, and DJ Jay St. Paul kick it with Kathy Averill – Mother of legendary Emcee, Eyedea. During the conversation, Kathy’s graciousness provides perspective on Eyedea’s ascension into the realm of “Legend,” as well as his desire for his music to serve as a voice for the voiceless. The conversation proves insightful and reinforces why the life and music of Eyedea continue to garner praise and celebration six years after his passing.

And as usual, DJ Jay St. Paul entertains us with a mix that appropriately pays homage to Michael “Eyedea” Larsen. Click below to listen.

 

Hit us up!
@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
@ygb79 (Twitter)
@lyrik1979 (IG)
@TCOHHLRadio (Facebook)
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com/

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C.Stats welcome back to the show, Masta Ace. This time, the conversation provides an in-depth look at the making and intent of Masta Ace’s latest album release, The Falling Season; a concept album that offers fans/listeners access to Masta Ace’s formative years as a teen growing up [in the early 80’s] in Brooklyn, NYC. Hip Hop heads…This is an episode that you don’t want to miss!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say that DJ Jay St. Paul blesses us with a mix that reminds us of Masta Ace’s dynamic career and why he is appropriately regarded as a legend.

Click below to hear the episode.

Hit us up!
@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
@ygb79 (Twitter)
@lyrik1979 (IG)
@TCOHHLRadio (Facebook)
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com/

It’s undeniable that Hip Hop [used as a tool to effect social change] has become a globally accepted culture. Beginning in The Bronx – New York City and making its way to the furthest corners of the Earth, a multitude of ethnicities/cultures that are supported by varying and opposing religious ideals are likely to have derived a respective iteration of Hip Hop while strictly adhering to the culture’s core principals. This is especially true for Kampala, Uganda – Africa based Kulture Future Kids (K.F.K.) – a Universal Zulu Nation supported local organization that looks to teach and inspire the youth of Uganda by using Hip Hop’s celebrated values and elements.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the organizers of the K.F.K. program to discuss life in Uganda, the intent of their community based social initiative, and the country’s local Hip Hop scene. And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

Click below to hear the show.

Hit us up!
@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
@ygb79 (Twitter)
@lyrik1979 (IG)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Chronicles-of-a-Hip-Hop-Legend/124999960869348
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com

 

The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend has released a new marketing image that looks to further reinforce the brand’s intent of becoming the preeminent source of content for all things related to Hip Hop culture.

Roughly two years have elapsed since the launch of its Radio/Media counterpart, TCOHHL_Radio, and already the effort has amassed several dozen interviews with some of Hip Hop’s more celebrated contributors with more on the way. In addition, TCOHHL boasts an array of guests [from a Champion Chess Grandmaster to a Super Bowl contributing classically trained Musician] that support the lesser known 5th element of Hip Hop culture being, “Knowledge.”

From books to radio, The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend’s approach has proven unorthodox but refreshing in a manner that undoubtedly positions itself as a contemporary Subject Matter Expert for all things pertaining to the culture.

Stay tuned. TCOHHL has only just begun. Word is born!

Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to listen to the TCOHHL Radio show archives.

Visit tcohhl.bandcamp.com to download the entire 1st book in The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend literary series.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner welcomes his older, Corey Turner, Esq. to the TCOHHL experience and together they kick it with celebrated DJ, Music Producer, Documentarian, Hip Hop purveyor/protector, and Host of the Fran Lover Show, Fran Lover. With a relationship that goes back more than 30 years [with origins firmly planted in the Linden Housing development located in the East New York section of Brooklyn – NYC], the discussion unfolds in a manner that proves familiar, insightful, nostalgic, and entertaining.

And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say we appropriately explore Hip Hop’s Rap music timeline through an unfiltered and undisturbed East New York lens.

12274460_1041166612608274_503728687420919834_n

Click below to hear the episode.

Hit us up!

@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Chronicles-of-a-Hip-Hop-Legend/124999960869348

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the King of Content, James ‘Kraze’ Billings. During our conversation we discuss his Long Island – New York roots, his journey towards becoming the King of Content, his past projects with FUBU and Audi, his Industry Muscle website and brand, his upcoming projects [including a documentaries on Hip Hop lyrical legends, Rakim Allah and Biz Markie] and a truly riveting discussion on Hip Hop’s cultural appropriation.

Industry-Muscle-Logo-h4-BS

And regarding the playlist? Not only do we open the show with a gap-bridging event, we satisfy your appetite with a pure and authentic Hip Hop experience.

Hearing good music, in its originally composed format, makes for a great experience. But when that original composition is reinterpreted in a manner that explores and subsequently identifies additional depth in the piece, the listener finds themselves thrust into a subjective space where the sound’s melodic pleasantries are perhaps as ubiquitous as the smell of ripe fruit emanating from a NYC Produce stand on a hot summer’s day.

By far, Hip Hop has led the charge in the reinterpretation of classic music compositions; inherent to the existence of true Hip Hop DJs, Producers, and Beat Makers is the beloved activity of Crate Digging – The process of sourcing past obscure and popular music titles for the purpose of reinterpreting the original composition to make it anew. At the beginning of Hip Hop’s timeline, the infancy of this skill would be displayed by pioneering DJs [like DJ Kool Herc, DJ Hollywood, DJ Afrika Islam, DJ Grandmaster Flowers, DJ Afrika Bambaataa, DJ Grandmaster Flash, DJ Grand Wizard Theodore, Kool DJ Red Alert, DJ Marley Marl, DJ Chuck Chillout, and DJ Jazzy Jay], all of whom would maintain the collective momentum and engagement of partygoers by manually extending/looping identified drum patterns from previously released classic Soul/R&B compositions. This would come to be known as the Break-Beat; the keystone and arguably most fundamental component of Hip Hop’s, Rap music. Celebrated beat and production craftsmen that have and continue to indulge in this process while making advancements to the skill include the likes of the legendary J-Dilla, DJ Pete Rock, DJ Premier, DJ Quik, Dr. Dre, No I.D., Hank and Keith Shocklee (The Bomb Squad), Q-Tip, Kanye West, Timbaland, 9th Wonder, and Just Blaze.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

But also leading the effort of this discipline is Detroit’s own, Tall Black Guy. Tall Black Guy has coined a sound and music production style [amidst the realm of Hip Hop] that is truly all his own. To attempt to contextualize the depth of his creativity in words is to be of a disservice to Tall Black Guy and the effort of explanation related to his level of musicianship. So, in traditional TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio fashion, we’d like to formally invite you to check out the upcoming, ‘Tall Black Guy Chapter.’ This Wednesday on March 16th, TCOHHL Radio kicks it with Mo-Town’s own, T.B.G. With him, we discuss his childhood, musical influences, production style, Hip Hop culture, past/present/future projects, and a host of other topics. And the playlist you ask? Let’s just say that this will be a great opportunity for you to be introduced and/or reminded of the skill and style of our homie, Tall Black Guy.

By: D.D. Turner , Founder/Executive Producer/Host – TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard

Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard

Mixcloud.com/TCOHHL_Radio

Chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird! Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview. And while you’re there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.

Can you recall the moment when you realized that Hip Hop’s sound and look was multi-dimensional? In pondering an answer to this question, our collective recollection as Hip Hop supporters would naturally transport us back to 1988 to engage memories of the endearing Native Tongue movement (Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Jungle Brothers, Black Sheep, Queen Latifah, Monie Love, Kool DJ Red Alert, Chi-Ali, and the Fu-Schnickens) and such an engagement would be undeniably correct. But in 1992, Hip Hop’s music would experience an infusion to its already present and unapologetically expressed consciousness. As supporters, we’d have the good fortune of being introduced to a new sound, spirit, and aestheticism that we had yet to experience up until that point. And the provider of this experience you ask? Arrested Development and their debut release, ‘3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days In The Life Of…

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Arrested Development is legendary. During a time when Hip Hop’s Rap music was already at its multi-dimensional peak, A.D. [Arrested Development] further pushed the music’s boundaries, thereby, creating another realm where the culture could thrive amidst the music business’s time and space construct. Arrested Development effectively reinforced the understanding that gaining and maintaining Knowledge of Self wasn’t the singular responsibility of Black culture; the duty was to also be proud of who we are while upholding an ever-present sense of integrity that is warranted by our African lineage. Additionally, through their soulfully conscious concoctions of melody, A.D. forced us to challenge popular perspective and engage individual thought and perception. After hearing ‘Mr. Wendal,’ how many of you found yourself driven by the inclination to engage a homeless person in dialogue? I did and found the conversation to be extremely enlightening and impactful. From ‘Everyday People’ to ‘Tennessee’ to ‘Revolution’ to Speech’s Hip Hop Proclamation, ‘Can U Hear Me,’ back to the positive cultural assertions that ‘Natural Hair’ imparted to some of the group’s current releases like, ‘Follow That,’ and ‘Weight (Off My Back),’ Arrested Development has always been endowed with a capability of authoring music that connects with the consciousness of humanity without sacrificing Hip Hop’s Boom-Bap signature.

This Wednesday on March 2nd, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio kicks it with Speech, Founder and Front-Man of the legendary Arrested Development collective. With Speech, we discuss growing up in Milwaukee and Tennessee, the formation of Arrested Development, cultural awareness, their new projects, and a host of other topics.

By: D.D. Turner , Founder/Executive Producer/Host – TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard

Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard

Mixcloud.com/TCOHHL_Radio

Chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird. Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview on March 2nd. And while you’re there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.

“…these are the words that I manifest. I Manifest.” – Gang Starr, Manifest (No More Mr. Nice Guy, 1989 – Wild Pitch Records/EMI Records)

Peace, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

With sincerity, I submit this manifesto of gratitude and appreciation for your concern. More to the point and specific to this document’s intent, I thank you for your candor; your willingness to acknowledge the plight of Black people [through your dialogue invoking joint, White Privilege II] and the origination of what has proven to be an insurmountable social obstacle against the system of White Privilege. Your efforts are commendable, and brave to boot. Your public observance of what has been an issue for nearly 500 years is regarded as sincerely empathetic and not trivial, for it suggests that you understand the proper way in which to address and impart reasoning unto your cultural peers for the purpose of contextualizing the very real idea of white privilege, cultural appropriation, and cultural subjugation. However, while your song content and approach are unique and brim with quality, I’d be remiss if I failed to mention that the intent and goal aren’t. As I am sure you are aware, Hip Hop has always served as the initiate for social change, highlighting the adverse circumstances under which we were, are, and continue to be placed, per the ubiquitous nature of white privilege/supremacy.

Over the years, many of our beloved and legendary Emcees have worked to bring awareness to the problem while bolstering the richness and righteousness that is contained within us, the original man – “The maker, the owner, the cream of the planet Earth, Father of civilization, God of the Universe.” Legendary Emcees such as: KRS One – You Must Learn; PRT (Poor Righteous Teachers) – Shakiyla; X-Clan – Funkin’ Lesson; Lakim Shabazz – Black is Back; King Sun – Be Black; Big Daddy Kane – Young, Gifted, and Black ; Brand Nubians – Wake Up; Public Enemy – Fight The Power; Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five – The Message; Fearless Four – Problems of The World Today; Gang Starr – Royalty; Black Star (Mos Def & Talib Kweli) – Brown Skin Lady; Rakim – The Mystery; Nas – I Can, and a host of others that go unnamed but are equally recognized. Unfortunately, the gracious offerings of these artists wouldn’t surpass exposure beyond cultural relevance; the exception perhaps being those White brothers and sisters that were and continue to be avid Hip Hop supporters and/or historians.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Macklemore and Ryan, the point of the aforementioned is not to convey nor pose opposition to your song, but, to simply acknowledge those that have come before you [as you’ve most notably done on DownTown feat. Kool Moe Dee, Grandmaster Caz, and Grandmaster Melle Mel]and have leveraged the platform of Hip Hop culture as a means of effectuating social change, or in the least, spark the flame of cultural consideration amongst  White folks.

Regarding this matter, I found myself compelled to express my perspective. Not because I felt it necessary to align with the wayward backlash that you guys are being met with, but instead, to provide an articulate and respectful explanation of how we as Black folks potentially feel about your song, albeit gracious. On another note, I have to admit that I was somewhat indifferent about your career; I’d concur that your lyrical prowess is mostly enjoyable and your content/topics were interesting and sometimes even poignant but your songs never quite resonated with me. In fact, if I can be honest, I initially considered you to be just another White rapper using the benefit of implicit privilege, supremacy, carefree themes, flow patterns, suitable vocal inflections, and vocabulary to drive a career. A shift in my belief has since occurred causing me to depart from this perspective and see that in fact, White people can genuinely care about and be invested in the long-term sustainability of Black culture. The two of you have proven this through your public sincerity and gratitude for the incomparable contributions that Black culture has imparted unto the world.  You guys have possibly set the stage for change amongst White people and it is now time to execute.

Below are some recommendations of how you can further facilitate an understanding amongst your ethnic peers regarding the social dynamic between Black and White people and how it is impacted by the system of White Privilege.  Some recommended group talking points amongst White people are as follows:

  • Don’t be threatened by the assertion of Black [and Brown] Pride
  • Seek opportunities that support/reinforce empathy for the Black [and Brown] experience
  • Similarities between the Black and White racial/social experience is virtually non-existent
  • Understand that the statement, “Black Lives Matter” is not suggestive of racism or a disregard for White lives
  • Gentrification is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that forces cultural displacement
  • White flight is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that erodes the cultural diversity in a neighborhood, thereby, causing the inevitability of poverty as a result of ethnic stereotyping
  • Amongst Black people, Rioting is never a result of animalistic and/or apathetic manifestations. Instead, it is the result of hopelessness in the face of racial adversity, inequality, and injustice
  • Effectively, Black [and Brown] people can’t reasonably be regarded as racist amidst the looming shadows of systematic White Privilege/Supremacy

Again, I thank you [prospective Hip Hop Legends] for your willingness to create the basis upon which healthy dialogue regarding the issue of ethnic privilege will perhaps come to thrive. It is my hope that the perspective shared in this manifesto has merely served as additional context and has imparted suggestive instructions that look to contribute to a foundation of better understanding the Black experience.

Thank you in advance for the engagement. Looking forward to hearing back from you.

One,

D.D. Turner, Enforcer of Negritude

TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

@TCOHHL_Radio

mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio

tcohhl.wordpress.com

chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com