Archive for the ‘Equality’ Category

It’s undeniable that Hip Hop [used as a tool to effect social change] has become a globally accepted culture. Beginning in The Bronx – New York City and making its way to the furthest corners of the Earth, a multitude of ethnicities/cultures that are supported by varying and opposing religious ideals are likely to have derived a respective iteration of Hip Hop while strictly adhering to the culture’s core principals. This is especially true for Kampala, Uganda – Africa based Kulture Future Kids (K.F.K.) – a Universal Zulu Nation supported local organization that looks to teach and inspire the youth of Uganda by using Hip Hop’s celebrated values and elements.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the organizers of the K.F.K. program to discuss life in Uganda, the intent of their community based social initiative, and the country’s local Hip Hop scene. And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

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Are you an avid Shark Tank watcher? Do you recall season 6 – episode 11? An extremely poised Lydia Evans and her SWAG Essentials Company positioned a product before the Sharks and viewing audience that addressed the skin care and grooming concerns of countless men; that would be the dreaded affliction of Pseudofolliculitis (Razor Bumps). Since this episode, Lydia and her Swag Essentials brand have grown tremendously by offering a range of products that address the grooming healthfulness and sensibilities of an array of people, all while experiencing a revenue growth of more than 250%.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with Lydia Evans to discuss her life and journey towards entrepreneurship, her Shark Tank experience, and the future of SWAG Essentials.

And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of #HipHop’s glorious history, past and present, by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

Click below to hear this episode!

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@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
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On the most recent episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it Dr. Melina Abdullah, Professor and Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University – Los Angeles and Organizer of the Black Lives Matter movement. During our time spent with Dr. Abdullah, we discuss her formative years in Oakland, education, her involvement in the Black Lives Matter movement as an Organizer, and her support of Jasmine Abdullah – The #BlackLivesMatter Organizer [and Founder of Black Lives Matter – Pasadena] that was falsely convicted and incarcerated [for Felony Lynching] after coming to the aid of a fellow peaceful protester that was being arrested by Police.

Felony Lynching – “A rarely used statute in California law… Under California’s penal code, “felony lynching” was defined as attempting to take a person out of police custody. Jasmine was arrested and charged with felony lynching last September, after police accused her of trying to de-arrest someone during a peace march at La Pintoresca Park in Pasadena on August 29, 2015.”  Democracy Now, 2016

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As usual, the TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history; past and present all the while bringing recognition to the noble efforts and courageousness of Dr. Melina Abdullah, Jasmine Abdullah, Nana Gyamfi, and the countless others that work tirelessly for Black liberation and equality. Click the link below to listen to the episode.

 

 

 

 

 

Since the beginning, Hip Hop culture has always rested firmly upon the premise of education and the need thereof.  Submitting to the idea of education serving as the basis of honing a discipline was always integral to the success of Breakers, Graffiti Artists, Lyricists, and DJs/Producers/Beat Makers alike. The idea was simple – without a devotion to learning the craft, one would likely be considered a fraud; a Half-Stepper according to the assertion of the legendary Big Daddy Kane.

But as Hip Hop progressed, these skilled and educated Hip Hop Artists began to gain more monetary success for their talents, creating some extremely comfortable lifestyles in the process. But when the money comes in fast and regularly, the pace of the financial education needed to act responsibly with it is often not commensurate.

As minorities, we generally lack education in personal finance.  From Vehicles to Homes, we often make purchase decisions using the desires of the heart and ego and not the pragmatism and rationale of the mind, thereby resulting in the stress heavy experience of living beyond our means; a problem that also confronts our White counterparts but often goes undiscussed and unconsidered within the confines of Black and Brown communities. And why should it? The responsibility of rectifying instances of educational and financial disparities should never rest with those that cause the disparity, but instead, those that are disparaged, for the purpose of fulfilling the desire to be better and tapping into the inherent greatness that resides within begins with introspection and self-initiative, resulting in self-betterment or perhaps even, the realization of self-purpose.

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So, being devoted to Hip Hop and also having a genuine concern for the education of our people, we found it necessary to leverage the culture’s 5th and perhaps most unexplored element of ‘Knowledge/Education’ as a tool to impart some enlightenment on the matter of Personal Finance. To facilitate this, on our next episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, we’ll be speaking with the wonderful, LaShonda Johnson of the Houston Housewives of Finance; a national organization [with a growing list of chapters] that successfully empowers individuals with the tools necessary to arrive at a place of effective financial literacy. From credit cards to the dreadful Student loan(s) to the selection of the appropriate life insurance policy, LaShonda graciously schools us on various aspects of personal finance while dispelling some of the long-standing misconceptions and circumstances of financial miseducation that so many of us have fell victim to – like my severely misguided and uninformed decision to purchase a $600.00 leather Avirex jacket [back in 1997] while being a full time College Student with part-time employment.

Taking notes while listening to this episode is recommended – Class will be in session!

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By: D.D. Turner, Founder/Executive Producer/Host
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard
Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard
Tcohhl.bandcamp.com

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the creators of the Tuskegee Heirs animated series, Greg Burnham and Marcus Williams. During our conversation, we discuss their respective roots, the artistry of animation, their amazing animated series, and the unparalleled history and courageousness of the Tuskegee Airmen.

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Also, to celebrate the life, legacy, and genius of the legendary musician, Prince, we open up the show with a self-authored poem by TCOHHL Radio co-founder, Ishmael Street, followed by a review of why Prince will forever be regarded as an icon. And don’t worry, you appetite for a pure and authentic Hip Hop experience will be thoroughly satisfied.

Can you recall the moment when you realized that Hip Hop’s sound and look was multi-dimensional? In pondering an answer to this question, our collective recollection as Hip Hop supporters would naturally transport us back to 1988 to engage memories of the endearing Native Tongue movement (Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Jungle Brothers, Black Sheep, Queen Latifah, Monie Love, Kool DJ Red Alert, Chi-Ali, and the Fu-Schnickens) and such an engagement would be undeniably correct. But in 1992, Hip Hop’s music would experience an infusion to its already present and unapologetically expressed consciousness. As supporters, we’d have the good fortune of being introduced to a new sound, spirit, and aestheticism that we had yet to experience up until that point. And the provider of this experience you ask? Arrested Development and their debut release, ‘3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days In The Life Of…

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Arrested Development is legendary. During a time when Hip Hop’s Rap music was already at its multi-dimensional peak, A.D. [Arrested Development] further pushed the music’s boundaries, thereby, creating another realm where the culture could thrive amidst the music business’s time and space construct. Arrested Development effectively reinforced the understanding that gaining and maintaining Knowledge of Self wasn’t the singular responsibility of Black culture; the duty was to also be proud of who we are while upholding an ever-present sense of integrity that is warranted by our African lineage. Additionally, through their soulfully conscious concoctions of melody, A.D. forced us to challenge popular perspective and engage individual thought and perception. After hearing ‘Mr. Wendal,’ how many of you found yourself driven by the inclination to engage a homeless person in dialogue? I did and found the conversation to be extremely enlightening and impactful. From ‘Everyday People’ to ‘Tennessee’ to ‘Revolution’ to Speech’s Hip Hop Proclamation, ‘Can U Hear Me,’ back to the positive cultural assertions that ‘Natural Hair’ imparted to some of the group’s current releases like, ‘Follow That,’ and ‘Weight (Off My Back),’ Arrested Development has always been endowed with a capability of authoring music that connects with the consciousness of humanity without sacrificing Hip Hop’s Boom-Bap signature.

This Wednesday on March 2nd, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio kicks it with Speech, Founder and Front-Man of the legendary Arrested Development collective. With Speech, we discuss growing up in Milwaukee and Tennessee, the formation of Arrested Development, cultural awareness, their new projects, and a host of other topics.

By: D.D. Turner , Founder/Executive Producer/Host – TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard

Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard

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**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird. Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview on March 2nd. And while you’re there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.

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Kendrick ‘K-Dot’ Lamar!

With 11 nominations, it was inevitable. But it’s no secret; Kendrick’s journey to this prestigious moment has been long, steady, and consistent. For those of us that have been fortunate enough to follow his exciting career, collectively we have bore witness to the maturation of a man; a man that overtly proclaims his love for the culture of Hip Hop while remaining aligned with its core principle of bringing awareness to social inequality and disparity. And never has he missed a step while engaging in the discipline of Emceeing.

So, to our revered and celebrated, Kendrick Lamar, The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) congratulates you on your amazing accomplishment. Not only is it well deserved, it serves as a worthy testament of Hip Hop’s power and its ability to transcend cultural and socio-economic differences.

Kendrick ‘K-Dot’ Lamar, standing resolute in the shadow of the legendary, N.W.A., you are an appropriate victor.  Compton, California…Stand the f$@k up!! This is your moment.

– D.D. Turner, Purveyor of Hip Hop Culture
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
@TCOHHL_Radio
mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio

“…these are the words that I manifest. I Manifest.” – Gang Starr, Manifest (No More Mr. Nice Guy, 1989 – Wild Pitch Records/EMI Records)

Peace, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

With sincerity, I submit this manifesto of gratitude and appreciation for your concern. More to the point and specific to this document’s intent, I thank you for your candor; your willingness to acknowledge the plight of Black people [through your dialogue invoking joint, White Privilege II] and the origination of what has proven to be an insurmountable social obstacle against the system of White Privilege. Your efforts are commendable, and brave to boot. Your public observance of what has been an issue for nearly 500 years is regarded as sincerely empathetic and not trivial, for it suggests that you understand the proper way in which to address and impart reasoning unto your cultural peers for the purpose of contextualizing the very real idea of white privilege, cultural appropriation, and cultural subjugation. However, while your song content and approach are unique and brim with quality, I’d be remiss if I failed to mention that the intent and goal aren’t. As I am sure you are aware, Hip Hop has always served as the initiate for social change, highlighting the adverse circumstances under which we were, are, and continue to be placed, per the ubiquitous nature of white privilege/supremacy.

Over the years, many of our beloved and legendary Emcees have worked to bring awareness to the problem while bolstering the richness and righteousness that is contained within us, the original man – “The maker, the owner, the cream of the planet Earth, Father of civilization, God of the Universe.” Legendary Emcees such as: KRS One – You Must Learn; PRT (Poor Righteous Teachers) – Shakiyla; X-Clan – Funkin’ Lesson; Lakim Shabazz – Black is Back; King Sun – Be Black; Big Daddy Kane – Young, Gifted, and Black ; Brand Nubians – Wake Up; Public Enemy – Fight The Power; Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five – The Message; Fearless Four – Problems of The World Today; Gang Starr – Royalty; Black Star (Mos Def & Talib Kweli) – Brown Skin Lady; Rakim – The Mystery; Nas – I Can, and a host of others that go unnamed but are equally recognized. Unfortunately, the gracious offerings of these artists wouldn’t surpass exposure beyond cultural relevance; the exception perhaps being those White brothers and sisters that were and continue to be avid Hip Hop supporters and/or historians.

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Macklemore and Ryan, the point of the aforementioned is not to convey nor pose opposition to your song, but, to simply acknowledge those that have come before you [as you’ve most notably done on DownTown feat. Kool Moe Dee, Grandmaster Caz, and Grandmaster Melle Mel]and have leveraged the platform of Hip Hop culture as a means of effectuating social change, or in the least, spark the flame of cultural consideration amongst  White folks.

Regarding this matter, I found myself compelled to express my perspective. Not because I felt it necessary to align with the wayward backlash that you guys are being met with, but instead, to provide an articulate and respectful explanation of how we as Black folks potentially feel about your song, albeit gracious. On another note, I have to admit that I was somewhat indifferent about your career; I’d concur that your lyrical prowess is mostly enjoyable and your content/topics were interesting and sometimes even poignant but your songs never quite resonated with me. In fact, if I can be honest, I initially considered you to be just another White rapper using the benefit of implicit privilege, supremacy, carefree themes, flow patterns, suitable vocal inflections, and vocabulary to drive a career. A shift in my belief has since occurred causing me to depart from this perspective and see that in fact, White people can genuinely care about and be invested in the long-term sustainability of Black culture. The two of you have proven this through your public sincerity and gratitude for the incomparable contributions that Black culture has imparted unto the world.  You guys have possibly set the stage for change amongst White people and it is now time to execute.

Below are some recommendations of how you can further facilitate an understanding amongst your ethnic peers regarding the social dynamic between Black and White people and how it is impacted by the system of White Privilege.  Some recommended group talking points amongst White people are as follows:

  • Don’t be threatened by the assertion of Black [and Brown] Pride
  • Seek opportunities that support/reinforce empathy for the Black [and Brown] experience
  • Similarities between the Black and White racial/social experience is virtually non-existent
  • Understand that the statement, “Black Lives Matter” is not suggestive of racism or a disregard for White lives
  • Gentrification is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that forces cultural displacement
  • White flight is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that erodes the cultural diversity in a neighborhood, thereby, causing the inevitability of poverty as a result of ethnic stereotyping
  • Amongst Black people, Rioting is never a result of animalistic and/or apathetic manifestations. Instead, it is the result of hopelessness in the face of racial adversity, inequality, and injustice
  • Effectively, Black [and Brown] people can’t reasonably be regarded as racist amidst the looming shadows of systematic White Privilege/Supremacy

Again, I thank you [prospective Hip Hop Legends] for your willingness to create the basis upon which healthy dialogue regarding the issue of ethnic privilege will perhaps come to thrive. It is my hope that the perspective shared in this manifesto has merely served as additional context and has imparted suggestive instructions that look to contribute to a foundation of better understanding the Black experience.

Thank you in advance for the engagement. Looking forward to hearing back from you.

One,

D.D. Turner, Enforcer of Negritude

TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

@TCOHHL_Radio

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