Archive for the ‘Black People’ Category

October 14th was a typical Friday night in Harlem, a little windy but relatively calm until you reached 135th & Lenox.  As we walked by the Schomburg Center for Research In Black Culture  we could smell the food trucks, see the flowing gowns and bowties, but the most intriguing sense was hearing the plethora of voices speaking about the rise of women in Film and TV!  This was the night African Voices hosted the Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival & Lecture Series event.  Kim Coles, the lively and forever funny mistress of ceremonies, presented Cathy Hughes (Radio One & TV One) with the Reel Sisters Hattie McDaniel Award and Naturi Naughton (from Power) with the Trailblazer Award.  This one event is a part of a two week celebration of women of color in film and media held in various venues throughout New York City.

Before all the awards went out, my associate, Juanita Miller and myself had the opportunity to walk the red carpet and speak with a few of the participants, the award winners, and Carolyn A. Butts, founder of Reel Sisters. Butts was clearly proud of the hard work that her and her team put in to coordinate such a successful event.  “I am very proud of my team for putting this together. This is our way of congratulating these pioneering women for the tremendous roles they play in promoting progress in film and media for women of color!” Butts excitedly stated.

Butts’ gratitude and excitement was contagious as Kim Coles also expressed her feelings towards the event and the progress of women of color in general. When asked if she was excited to host the awards, Coles said “I am honored to be a part of this event, let alone host it, and I am very excited to see Naturi Naughton & Cathy Hughes.  I’ve worked for Cathy for years and can’t wait to see her receive this prestigious award. And Naturi is doing a fantastic job for herself and paving the way for many more to come.”  Coles also mentioned that she is “all about lifting women of color’s voices and an advocate for women. I am also an advocate for men, just not at the expense of women.”  

Phyllis Stickney (The Inkwell & New Jack City actress) talked about her own involvement with uplifting women of color when she discussed her relatively new program designed to assist young women in transition called “Get Wit It.”  The program is filled with workshops to teach young women independence, life skills, and job preparation.  Stickney spoke intensely about the advancement of women of color stating “the support system has changed and we need to give these women an opportunity to have their right of passage!”

On that note, the red carpet was rolled up and we all proceeded to the show.  Kimberly Nichole’s (The Voice) fresh and powerful voice opened up the ceremony. Then Coles vibrantly took the stage and hosted with passion. The audience was very receptive to her boisterous personality and gave an abundant amount of applause when she expressed her view on the progress of women of color in media.  Coles talked about how important it is to stay relative in a world of fast growing technology and for all of us to empower and educate the young women of today.

After a brief video about the history of Hattie McDaniel who had the first black syndicated radio show, Hughes was presented the Hattie McDaniel Award by Kevin John Goff, McDaniel’s great grand-nephew. Hughes although having back pain at the time,  graciously got on stage as the crowd gave her a standing ovation and showed their gratefulness for her hard work.  She spoke eloquently, thanking Reel Sisters for the award and reminded the crowd that hard work does pay off.   She brought to light that her dedication to making it happen was not painless or easy.  Hughes stated, “I remember awhile back I was working day and night on Radio One, I thought I had the first black syndicated radio show and I was so happy!  Then someone told me about Hattie’s. I thought to myself: well then, I will have the first television station!” She gave many accolades to her mother who was “kind and gave everything she could to make someone’s day better ” and how she incorporates that mentality into her work.  Hughes then expressed her gratefulness to the organization for having the ceremony and the importance of women encouraging and helping each other in order to stay progressive.  

Meli’sa Morgan brought down the house with a halftime performance of her hit “Good Love.”  Shortly afterwards, the next announcement was for Naturi Naughton to accept her Trailblazer Award.  From 3LW to being a main character, Tasha on Power, Naughton has fought tooth and nail to make her presence known in the world of music and film. She gracefully took the stage and stood in shock as the crowd rose to give her applause.  In her acceptance speech Naughton mentioned she felt like she “was still blazing the trail” and gave a huge shout out to her parents for believing in her dream.  She represented East Orange, New Jersey giving “thanks to New Hope Union Baptist Church for inspiring her to have this dream and to all the fans making this dream a reality.” Naughton finished with thanking Hughes for opening doors. She added, “who knows if I’d be where I am at right now.”

When all was said and done, Coles wrapped up the ceremony giving thanks to Carolyn Butts, Film Festival Curator Lisa Durden and Council Members Jumaane Williams and Laurie Cumbo for their hard work and dedication to Reel Sisters.  Group photos of everyone involved were taken and then the celebrities took time to take selfies with their fans.  Once everyone dispersed, the attendees took pleasure in taking photos in front of the step and repeat and paid tribute to Reel Sisters for having the event.  As a women of color who is involved in the world of media, attending the ceremony was truly a delightful and eye opening experience.  The amount of support that the men and women have towards the education and empowerment of women of color made the Reel Sisters of the Diaspora Film Festival & Lecture Series Award Ceremony irrefutably necessary. There is no doubt in my mind that the future of Reel Sisters is bright and many women of color will have the opportunities to make their dream a reality because of its efforts.

*Michelle Zattoni is the Director of Public Relations for Lehigh Valley Faces in Allentown, Pennsylvania.

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It’s undeniable that Hip Hop [used as a tool to effect social change] has become a globally accepted culture. Beginning in The Bronx – New York City and making its way to the furthest corners of the Earth, a multitude of ethnicities/cultures that are supported by varying and opposing religious ideals are likely to have derived a respective iteration of Hip Hop while strictly adhering to the culture’s core principals. This is especially true for Kampala, Uganda – Africa based Kulture Future Kids (K.F.K.) – a Universal Zulu Nation supported local organization that looks to teach and inspire the youth of Uganda by using Hip Hop’s celebrated values and elements.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the organizers of the K.F.K. program to discuss life in Uganda, the intent of their community based social initiative, and the country’s local Hip Hop scene. And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

Click below to hear the show.

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Are you an avid Shark Tank watcher? Do you recall season 6 – episode 11? An extremely poised Lydia Evans and her SWAG Essentials Company positioned a product before the Sharks and viewing audience that addressed the skin care and grooming concerns of countless men; that would be the dreaded affliction of Pseudofolliculitis (Razor Bumps). Since this episode, Lydia and her Swag Essentials brand have grown tremendously by offering a range of products that address the grooming healthfulness and sensibilities of an array of people, all while experiencing a revenue growth of more than 250%.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with Lydia Evans to discuss her life and journey towards entrepreneurship, her Shark Tank experience, and the future of SWAG Essentials.

And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of #HipHop’s glorious history, past and present, by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

Click below to hear this episode!

Hit us up!

@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
@ygb79 (Twitter)
@lyrik1979 (IG)
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Chronicles-of-a-Hip-Hop-Legend/124999960869348
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner welcomes his older, Corey Turner, Esq. to the TCOHHL experience and together they kick it with celebrated DJ, Music Producer, Documentarian, Hip Hop purveyor/protector, and Host of the Fran Lover Show, Fran Lover. With a relationship that goes back more than 30 years [with origins firmly planted in the Linden Housing development located in the East New York section of Brooklyn – NYC], the discussion unfolds in a manner that proves familiar, insightful, nostalgic, and entertaining.

And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say we appropriately explore Hip Hop’s Rap music timeline through an unfiltered and undisturbed East New York lens.

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Click below to hear the episode.

Hit us up!

@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)
@hiphops_wizard (IG/Twitter)
https://tcohhl.wordpress.com
http://tcohhl.bandcamp.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Chronicles-of-a-Hip-Hop-Legend/124999960869348

On the most recent episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it Dr. Melina Abdullah, Professor and Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University – Los Angeles and Organizer of the Black Lives Matter movement. During our time spent with Dr. Abdullah, we discuss her formative years in Oakland, education, her involvement in the Black Lives Matter movement as an Organizer, and her support of Jasmine Abdullah – The #BlackLivesMatter Organizer [and Founder of Black Lives Matter – Pasadena] that was falsely convicted and incarcerated [for Felony Lynching] after coming to the aid of a fellow peaceful protester that was being arrested by Police.

Felony Lynching – “A rarely used statute in California law… Under California’s penal code, “felony lynching” was defined as attempting to take a person out of police custody. Jasmine was arrested and charged with felony lynching last September, after police accused her of trying to de-arrest someone during a peace march at La Pintoresca Park in Pasadena on August 29, 2015.”  Democracy Now, 2016

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As usual, the TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history; past and present all the while bringing recognition to the noble efforts and courageousness of Dr. Melina Abdullah, Jasmine Abdullah, Nana Gyamfi, and the countless others that work tirelessly for Black liberation and equality. Click the link below to listen to the episode.

 

 

 

 

 

Since the beginning, Hip Hop culture has always rested firmly upon the premise of education and the need thereof.  Submitting to the idea of education serving as the basis of honing a discipline was always integral to the success of Breakers, Graffiti Artists, Lyricists, and DJs/Producers/Beat Makers alike. The idea was simple – without a devotion to learning the craft, one would likely be considered a fraud; a Half-Stepper according to the assertion of the legendary Big Daddy Kane.

But as Hip Hop progressed, these skilled and educated Hip Hop Artists began to gain more monetary success for their talents, creating some extremely comfortable lifestyles in the process. But when the money comes in fast and regularly, the pace of the financial education needed to act responsibly with it is often not commensurate.

As minorities, we generally lack education in personal finance.  From Vehicles to Homes, we often make purchase decisions using the desires of the heart and ego and not the pragmatism and rationale of the mind, thereby resulting in the stress heavy experience of living beyond our means; a problem that also confronts our White counterparts but often goes undiscussed and unconsidered within the confines of Black and Brown communities. And why should it? The responsibility of rectifying instances of educational and financial disparities should never rest with those that cause the disparity, but instead, those that are disparaged, for the purpose of fulfilling the desire to be better and tapping into the inherent greatness that resides within begins with introspection and self-initiative, resulting in self-betterment or perhaps even, the realization of self-purpose.

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So, being devoted to Hip Hop and also having a genuine concern for the education of our people, we found it necessary to leverage the culture’s 5th and perhaps most unexplored element of ‘Knowledge/Education’ as a tool to impart some enlightenment on the matter of Personal Finance. To facilitate this, on our next episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, we’ll be speaking with the wonderful, LaShonda Johnson of the Houston Housewives of Finance; a national organization [with a growing list of chapters] that successfully empowers individuals with the tools necessary to arrive at a place of effective financial literacy. From credit cards to the dreadful Student loan(s) to the selection of the appropriate life insurance policy, LaShonda graciously schools us on various aspects of personal finance while dispelling some of the long-standing misconceptions and circumstances of financial miseducation that so many of us have fell victim to – like my severely misguided and uninformed decision to purchase a $600.00 leather Avirex jacket [back in 1997] while being a full time College Student with part-time employment.

Taking notes while listening to this episode is recommended – Class will be in session!

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By: D.D. Turner, Founder/Executive Producer/Host
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard
Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard
Tcohhl.bandcamp.com

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the King of Content, James ‘Kraze’ Billings. During our conversation we discuss his Long Island – New York roots, his journey towards becoming the King of Content, his past projects with FUBU and Audi, his Industry Muscle website and brand, his upcoming projects [including a documentaries on Hip Hop lyrical legends, Rakim Allah and Biz Markie] and a truly riveting discussion on Hip Hop’s cultural appropriation.

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And regarding the playlist? Not only do we open the show with a gap-bridging event, we satisfy your appetite with a pure and authentic Hip Hop experience.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the creators of the Tuskegee Heirs animated series, Greg Burnham and Marcus Williams. During our conversation, we discuss their respective roots, the artistry of animation, their amazing animated series, and the unparalleled history and courageousness of the Tuskegee Airmen.

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Also, to celebrate the life, legacy, and genius of the legendary musician, Prince, we open up the show with a self-authored poem by TCOHHL Radio co-founder, Ishmael Street, followed by a review of why Prince will forever be regarded as an icon. And don’t worry, you appetite for a pure and authentic Hip Hop experience will be thoroughly satisfied.

Youthful expression in Hip Hop has always been fundamental to the culture. After all, the youth collectively are and have always been responsible for the long-term sustainability and progressiveness of the culture. In a recent conversation, I went on record saying that Hip Hop and I are twins; there are very few recollected moments in my life in which Hip Hop hasn’t been a major fixture.

In this regard, DJ Kool Flash and I are similar. Where we differ however is DJ Kool Flash’s ability to profess her support of the culture [at her present age] in a way that is extremely passionate, expressive, and masterful.

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This week on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio (4/20/2016), D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the talented future legend, DJ Kool Flash. During our time spent with DJ Kool Flash, we discuss her Hip Hop roots, her favorite Hip Hop artists, and equally as exciting and riveting, her introduction and ongoing skill development as a Turntablist. And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say it bridges the musical gap and effectively celebrates those Hip Hop artists that started out young…Like DJ Kool Flash.

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By: D.D. Turner, Founder/Executive Producer/Host
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard
Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard
Chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird! Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to listen to our show archives. And while there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.**

 

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The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) Radio is deeply saddened by the untimely passing of pioneering lyricist and Hip Hop purveyor, Phife Dawg. So, to appropriately celebrate the life and legacy of our beloved Hip Hop hero, D.D. Turner, Stats, and Mr. Street recorded this show in his honor and memory.

Follow the link below to stream the Phife Dawg Tribute episode/chapter.