Archive for the ‘Young Adults’ Category

It’s no secret, to be successful in life employing strategy is imperative. More than proving to be a formidable tool against those inevitable obstacles, it offers organization amidst the ever-present chaos. For context, let’s consider the discipline of a chess strategist/player. The absence of emotion veils the calculations of the mind; that strategic design that is ultimately disclosed upon the surface of a mere checkered pattern with monarchical pieces. For all intents and purposes, the game of chess is life’s simulator. By way of opponent intent and the assessment of it, your willingness to enforce strategy supports self-sustainability, and if executed correctly, triumph over your worthy adversary. Just ask Maurice Ashley – chess strategist/aficionado and the first African American to receive the “Grandmaster” title from the World Chess Federation, FIDE (Fédération Internationale des Échecs).

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner, C. Stats, and DJ Jay St. Paul kick it with chess Grandmaster, Maurice Ashley. With him, the crew discusses his journey towards becoming a world renowned chess player, his effort to continue to increase the game’s exposure, and why everyone should consider the game and its inherent strategies as a tool to help navigate life’s obstacles.
And as usual, DJ Jay St. Paul entertains us with a mix that effectively highlights the game of chess’ reference in Hip Hop music. Click below to listen.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C.Stats welcome back to the show, Masta Ace. This time, the conversation provides an in-depth look at the making and intent of Masta Ace’s latest album release, The Falling Season; a concept album that offers fans/listeners access to Masta Ace’s formative years as a teen growing up [in the early 80’s] in Brooklyn, NYC. Hip Hop heads…This is an episode that you don’t want to miss!

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And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say that DJ Jay St. Paul blesses us with a mix that reminds us of Masta Ace’s dynamic career and why he is appropriately regarded as a legend.

Click below to hear the episode.

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It’s undeniable that Hip Hop [used as a tool to effect social change] has become a globally accepted culture. Beginning in The Bronx – New York City and making its way to the furthest corners of the Earth, a multitude of ethnicities/cultures that are supported by varying and opposing religious ideals are likely to have derived a respective iteration of Hip Hop while strictly adhering to the culture’s core principals. This is especially true for Kampala, Uganda – Africa based Kulture Future Kids (K.F.K.) – a Universal Zulu Nation supported local organization that looks to teach and inspire the youth of Uganda by using Hip Hop’s celebrated values and elements.

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On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the organizers of the K.F.K. program to discuss life in Uganda, the intent of their community based social initiative, and the country’s local Hip Hop scene. And as usual, the #TCOHHL Team takes you on a journey of Hip Hop’s glorious history by way of the strategically constructed playlist.

Click below to hear the show.

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The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend has released a new marketing image that looks to further reinforce the brand’s intent of becoming the preeminent source of content for all things related to Hip Hop culture.

Roughly two years have elapsed since the launch of its Radio/Media counterpart, TCOHHL_Radio, and already the effort has amassed several dozen interviews with some of Hip Hop’s more celebrated contributors with more on the way. In addition, TCOHHL boasts an array of guests [from a Champion Chess Grandmaster to a Super Bowl contributing classically trained Musician] that support the lesser known 5th element of Hip Hop culture being, “Knowledge.”

From books to radio, The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend’s approach has proven unorthodox but refreshing in a manner that undoubtedly positions itself as a contemporary Subject Matter Expert for all things pertaining to the culture.

Stay tuned. TCOHHL has only just begun. Word is born!

Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to listen to the TCOHHL Radio show archives.

Visit tcohhl.bandcamp.com to download the entire 1st book in The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend literary series.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the King of Content, James ‘Kraze’ Billings. During our conversation we discuss his Long Island – New York roots, his journey towards becoming the King of Content, his past projects with FUBU and Audi, his Industry Muscle website and brand, his upcoming projects [including a documentaries on Hip Hop lyrical legends, Rakim Allah and Biz Markie] and a truly riveting discussion on Hip Hop’s cultural appropriation.

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And regarding the playlist? Not only do we open the show with a gap-bridging event, we satisfy your appetite with a pure and authentic Hip Hop experience.

On this episode of TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the creators of the Tuskegee Heirs animated series, Greg Burnham and Marcus Williams. During our conversation, we discuss their respective roots, the artistry of animation, their amazing animated series, and the unparalleled history and courageousness of the Tuskegee Airmen.

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Also, to celebrate the life, legacy, and genius of the legendary musician, Prince, we open up the show with a self-authored poem by TCOHHL Radio co-founder, Ishmael Street, followed by a review of why Prince will forever be regarded as an icon. And don’t worry, you appetite for a pure and authentic Hip Hop experience will be thoroughly satisfied.

Youthful expression in Hip Hop has always been fundamental to the culture. After all, the youth collectively are and have always been responsible for the long-term sustainability and progressiveness of the culture. In a recent conversation, I went on record saying that Hip Hop and I are twins; there are very few recollected moments in my life in which Hip Hop hasn’t been a major fixture.

In this regard, DJ Kool Flash and I are similar. Where we differ however is DJ Kool Flash’s ability to profess her support of the culture [at her present age] in a way that is extremely passionate, expressive, and masterful.

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This week on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio (4/20/2016), D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the talented future legend, DJ Kool Flash. During our time spent with DJ Kool Flash, we discuss her Hip Hop roots, her favorite Hip Hop artists, and equally as exciting and riveting, her introduction and ongoing skill development as a Turntablist. And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say it bridges the musical gap and effectively celebrates those Hip Hop artists that started out young…Like DJ Kool Flash.

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By: D.D. Turner, Founder/Executive Producer/Host
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard
Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard
Chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird! Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to listen to our show archives. And while there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.**

 

“…these are the words that I manifest. I Manifest.” – Gang Starr, Manifest (No More Mr. Nice Guy, 1989 – Wild Pitch Records/EMI Records)

Peace, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

With sincerity, I submit this manifesto of gratitude and appreciation for your concern. More to the point and specific to this document’s intent, I thank you for your candor; your willingness to acknowledge the plight of Black people [through your dialogue invoking joint, White Privilege II] and the origination of what has proven to be an insurmountable social obstacle against the system of White Privilege. Your efforts are commendable, and brave to boot. Your public observance of what has been an issue for nearly 500 years is regarded as sincerely empathetic and not trivial, for it suggests that you understand the proper way in which to address and impart reasoning unto your cultural peers for the purpose of contextualizing the very real idea of white privilege, cultural appropriation, and cultural subjugation. However, while your song content and approach are unique and brim with quality, I’d be remiss if I failed to mention that the intent and goal aren’t. As I am sure you are aware, Hip Hop has always served as the initiate for social change, highlighting the adverse circumstances under which we were, are, and continue to be placed, per the ubiquitous nature of white privilege/supremacy.

Over the years, many of our beloved and legendary Emcees have worked to bring awareness to the problem while bolstering the richness and righteousness that is contained within us, the original man – “The maker, the owner, the cream of the planet Earth, Father of civilization, God of the Universe.” Legendary Emcees such as: KRS One – You Must Learn; PRT (Poor Righteous Teachers) – Shakiyla; X-Clan – Funkin’ Lesson; Lakim Shabazz – Black is Back; King Sun – Be Black; Big Daddy Kane – Young, Gifted, and Black ; Brand Nubians – Wake Up; Public Enemy – Fight The Power; Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five – The Message; Fearless Four – Problems of The World Today; Gang Starr – Royalty; Black Star (Mos Def & Talib Kweli) – Brown Skin Lady; Rakim – The Mystery; Nas – I Can, and a host of others that go unnamed but are equally recognized. Unfortunately, the gracious offerings of these artists wouldn’t surpass exposure beyond cultural relevance; the exception perhaps being those White brothers and sisters that were and continue to be avid Hip Hop supporters and/or historians.

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Macklemore and Ryan, the point of the aforementioned is not to convey nor pose opposition to your song, but, to simply acknowledge those that have come before you [as you’ve most notably done on DownTown feat. Kool Moe Dee, Grandmaster Caz, and Grandmaster Melle Mel]and have leveraged the platform of Hip Hop culture as a means of effectuating social change, or in the least, spark the flame of cultural consideration amongst  White folks.

Regarding this matter, I found myself compelled to express my perspective. Not because I felt it necessary to align with the wayward backlash that you guys are being met with, but instead, to provide an articulate and respectful explanation of how we as Black folks potentially feel about your song, albeit gracious. On another note, I have to admit that I was somewhat indifferent about your career; I’d concur that your lyrical prowess is mostly enjoyable and your content/topics were interesting and sometimes even poignant but your songs never quite resonated with me. In fact, if I can be honest, I initially considered you to be just another White rapper using the benefit of implicit privilege, supremacy, carefree themes, flow patterns, suitable vocal inflections, and vocabulary to drive a career. A shift in my belief has since occurred causing me to depart from this perspective and see that in fact, White people can genuinely care about and be invested in the long-term sustainability of Black culture. The two of you have proven this through your public sincerity and gratitude for the incomparable contributions that Black culture has imparted unto the world.  You guys have possibly set the stage for change amongst White people and it is now time to execute.

Below are some recommendations of how you can further facilitate an understanding amongst your ethnic peers regarding the social dynamic between Black and White people and how it is impacted by the system of White Privilege.  Some recommended group talking points amongst White people are as follows:

  • Don’t be threatened by the assertion of Black [and Brown] Pride
  • Seek opportunities that support/reinforce empathy for the Black [and Brown] experience
  • Similarities between the Black and White racial/social experience is virtually non-existent
  • Understand that the statement, “Black Lives Matter” is not suggestive of racism or a disregard for White lives
  • Gentrification is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that forces cultural displacement
  • White flight is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that erodes the cultural diversity in a neighborhood, thereby, causing the inevitability of poverty as a result of ethnic stereotyping
  • Amongst Black people, Rioting is never a result of animalistic and/or apathetic manifestations. Instead, it is the result of hopelessness in the face of racial adversity, inequality, and injustice
  • Effectively, Black [and Brown] people can’t reasonably be regarded as racist amidst the looming shadows of systematic White Privilege/Supremacy

Again, I thank you [prospective Hip Hop Legends] for your willingness to create the basis upon which healthy dialogue regarding the issue of ethnic privilege will perhaps come to thrive. It is my hope that the perspective shared in this manifesto has merely served as additional context and has imparted suggestive instructions that look to contribute to a foundation of better understanding the Black experience.

Thank you in advance for the engagement. Looking forward to hearing back from you.

One,

D.D. Turner, Enforcer of Negritude

TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

@TCOHHL_Radio

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chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

 

 

 

 

Did you know that the H.H.D. Domain (Feedback’s Crib) in “The Chronicles if a Hip Hop Legend” is inspired by an actual location in Brooklyn, NYC’s, East New York section? Just look for the huge mountain at the Pennsylvania Ave exit along the eastbound Belt Pkwy. Well, it appears that the good folks at Google have hooked us up. Check out the map reference! Even more of a reason why you should check for this series. Visit chroniclesofahiphoplegend.com to get the #freeaudiobook today!
#hiphop

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The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend literary series represents the first multi-installment Hip Hop Fanta-Sci series. Albeit a work of fiction, the tale incorporates some aspects of real Hip Hop history to make for a comprehensive and captivating read/listen. Tune in every month as we release an additional 5 chapters of the installment. Simply follow us to receive the announcement of our new uploads. Our release schedule is as follows:

August – Chapters 1-5
September – Chapters 6-10
October – Chapters 11-15
November – Chapters 16-20
December – In recognition of the Holiday Season, it is likely that our gift to you will come in the form of more than the usual 5 chapter release!
January – Chapters 21-25
February – Chapters 26-30
March – Chapters 30-36

By March, you would have completed the entire 1st book in The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend series and will prepared to take on the 2nd installment in the series, Cipher and The Lost Relic of Pangea’s Core. So stay tuned, it is sure to be a magical ride for you and the culture of Hip Hop. Word is born!

Visit chroniclesofahiphoplegend.com to begin your #freeaudiobook journey!

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