Posts Tagged ‘90’s’

Imagine the revered 80’s Autobot leader, Optimus Prime, serving as a symbol of American pride and patriotism. What about a rather large, pixelated image of the classic video game persona, Dig-Dug, emblazoned across a shirt with arrows drawn? Does this evoke a sentiment of nostalgia yet? At its core, this is what 80U looks to accomplish; apparel that represents the fond memories of youthful indulgence without the compromise of quality and style. Additionally, with its contemporary creative iteration of classic themes/entertainment, 80U looks to become the preeminent brand that successfully bridges the generational gap.

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For its maiden voyage, 80U released the Brooklyn Pack; a colorful and stylish pairing of his and her shirts that brandish the celebrated lyrics of Brooklyn’s home town hero, Notorious BIG and his voluptuous Protegé, Lil Kim. These items are currently available for purchase at weare80u.com at a comparable industry price point. For an additional discount, use coupon code: SPRINGCLEANUP.

Very simply, 80s University’s long term goal is to become a brand that provides quality and stylish novelty fashion options for the consumer that is looking to revert back to an era where some of their life’s most fond memories were created. And in doing so, bring awareness to those themes that were seemingly lost in time.

So consider this a first class boarding pass onto the 80U train. Our destination? An unexplored location within the fashion universe that grants one wish; an opportunity to, Brand New Your Retro.

For more information on the history of 80’s University, click on the image below. Also, to hear our interview with the Founders of 80U, click on the mixcloud link below.

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DrDre-compton

Visualize this: A high risk surgical procedure that can either reinforce or destroy a reputation. The Surgeon leading the procedure works methodically, allowing his knowledge and experience to guide the delicate execution of his hands. The objective is implicit; don’t fuck this up! The intent of the procedure is to correct a problem, and above all else, restore some sense of hope and self-sustainability back to the life of the patient. The task is finally nearing completion. Regarding the Surgeon’s willingness to perform a corrective procedure, the past 16 years, according to his supporters, have been a period of assumed obsessiveness. The opportunity to experience his skill in an extensive capacity was thought to have been a thing of the past. But right when the fans of the Surgeon arrive at the edge of despair, prepared to release their hopes and dreams [of him showcasing his skills] into the darkened chasm of never-no-more, the Surgeon announces his completion. And the result? The long-awaited successful completion of a major surgery, proving that he hasn’t lost not even an ounce of skill.

More than restore quality of life, the good Doctor has rendered something masterful; his work somehow transcends the notion of individualized impact and provides healing unto several generations and perhaps, even insight unto those not privy to the significance of what he has achieved. This Surgeon is Compton, California and Hip Hop’s very own, Dr. Dre and the result of his execution is his latest release, Compton; an appropriate accompaniment to the feature film release, Straight Outta Compton.

“What the FUCK is going on with Detox?!” Albeit inarticulate, this was surely the collective sentiment of those of us yearning to recapture the moment when we first experienced Dr. Dre’s 1992 debut solo release, The Chronic. While the follow-up release, [Chronic] 2001, proved to deliver a satisfying schedule of bangers, it fell short of capturing the resonant impact of its predecessor. And while we managed to get a dose of the Doctor’s prescription over the years through his work with Eminem, 50 Cent, The Firm, Knoc-Turn’Al, Xzibit, Game, Snoop, and a host of others, none of this proved to be as potent of an elixir as hearing Dre over his own concoctions on a full-length project. And now that the day has arrived, those of us that found ourselves obsessing over this day, can now indulge in the experience that audible overdosing has to offer. And undoubtedly, this offers a formidable fix. No Detox needed!

Compton effectively syncs with the feel and tone of Kendrick Lamar’s recent release, To Pimp A Butterfly. It opens with an overview of Compton’s cultural history and offers transparency into the historical occurrence of the White-Flight phenomenon and the subsequent rise of deteriorated conditions following the influx of Black and Brown folks into the City. Following the intro, the album proceeds to convey a message; one that highlights the plight of Black and Brown existence in the inner-city and the assumptions that are perpetuated by the perspective of White Supremacy/Privilege ideology. But conversely, supported by its progressive sound, it imparts a sense of hope through Dre’s vulnerability; he offers full disclosure about the struggles of his life before success but without departing from the hardcore content that his fans have come to appreciate.

Ultimately, the project provides balance and confirms itself to not just be the continuation of Compton’s new sound, but more appropriately, the realization of an archetype that began more than 30 years prior as a result of the vision of the beloved Surgeon. That be Andre “Dr. Dre” Young. This shit knocks!!

By: D.D. Turner, #TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) / Chief Turd-Bird Annihilator

@TCOHHL_Radio (Twitter)

@hiphops_wizard (Twitter/IG)

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I am a certified, bonified, and qualified East New York – Brooklyn, New York City representative. Hell, without ever appearing obsessive and overbearing, I make it known whenever appropriate. And concerning my birthplace, I’ve never pulled any punches while amidst any conversations that call for the recognition of my hometown. I am exceedingly proud!

But at some point, we all perhaps find ourselves confronted with the wonderment of being from elsewhere; a rightful representative of a place that brimms with an undeniable flyness,  mystique, and culture. Offering full disclosure of my own wonderment of elsewhere, California, Los Angeles’, City of Compton, has always been on my list. And after seeing the NWA biopic, Straight Outta Compton, it has absolutely become my #1 pick.

I am an inner-city born and bred child of the 70s, 80s, and early 90s. Hip Hop culture is undoubtedly 1 of the 4 vertices on the principled square upon which I firmly plant my B-boy stance; right over left.  Being in tune with the culture has afforded me several realizations, one being Hip Hop’s viability as a form of social activism and awareness.

Coming of age in Brooklyn during the Crack Era, and experiencing instances of police brutality and profiling, Niggaz Wit Attitudes’ (#NWA), Fuck The [Mother Fucking] Police, song was pivotal, and poignant to boot. This song [as well as other NWA songs], along with the group’s mere presence, reflected the sentiments of many and reasserted Hip Hop’s power while establishing the West Coast’s position amongst the culture’s collective of pioneering Emcees. The daftness of the group was remarkable and if you’ve ever questioned the group’s street creditability, the biopic, Straight Outta Compton, provides an exciting portrayal for that ass.

While the persona depictions primarily focus on the lives of Eric “Eazy-E” Wright, Andre “Dr. Dre” Young, and O’Shea “Ice Cube” Jackson, it doesn’t miss a beat with the cleverly interwoven yet less explored contributions of Lorenzo “MC Ren” Patterson, Antoine “DJ Yella” Carraby, and the arguably infamous, Jerry Heller; with strong respresentations of Suge Knight, Tupac, The D.O.C., and Snoop Dogg.

To the credit of the actors, their ability to capture and convey the qualities of the portrayed personas proved satisfying and informing. More than an entertaining undertaking, the project provided a history lesson that often goes untold and unexplored by those Hip Hop enthusiasts that were not raised on the West Coast. Suge Knight starting out as a bodyguard for the D.O.C; Dr. Dre relinquishing his publishing rights to make his exit from Deathrow Records; Ice Cube’s issues with Priority Records, and the fearlessness of Eazy-E, represent just a few widely known and speculated topics that the work explores.

In the end, I left the movie feeling both satisfied and proud. The pre-release hype of those of us that revelled in the idea of there being a cinematic depiction of one of Hip Hop’s most pivotal and courageous groups was well justified. This is a #TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) classic and comes highly recommended as an addition to your Hip Hop film library. -DDTurner, #TCOHHL

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Do you remember this cover? Do you recall the feeling that you were overcome with when you set eyes on it for the first time? Tune into #TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio every Wednesday from 8-10pm est on tenacityradio.com and hear how we are looking to restore those feelings.

On the go? Then tune in to the live show via our mobile app using the link attached below.

http://tenacityradio.mobapp.at/#listen-live/Listen_Live

Or, perhaps you’re interested in catching up on our past shows. Then check out the show archives by visiting this link.
http://mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio