Archive for the ‘Hip Hop Music’ Category

Imagine the revered 80’s Autobot leader, Optimus Prime, serving as a symbol of American pride and patriotism. What about a rather large, pixelated image of the classic video game persona, Dig-Dug, emblazoned across a shirt with arrows drawn? Does this evoke a sentiment of nostalgia yet? At its core, this is what 80U looks to accomplish; apparel that represents the fond memories of youthful indulgence without the compromise of quality and style. Additionally, with its contemporary creative iteration of classic themes/entertainment, 80U looks to become the preeminent brand that successfully bridges the generational gap.

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For its maiden voyage, 80U released the Brooklyn Pack; a colorful and stylish pairing of his and her shirts that brandish the celebrated lyrics of Brooklyn’s home town hero, Notorious BIG and his voluptuous Protegé, Lil Kim. These items are currently available for purchase at weare80u.com at a comparable industry price point. For an additional discount, use coupon code: SPRINGCLEANUP.

Very simply, 80s University’s long term goal is to become a brand that provides quality and stylish novelty fashion options for the consumer that is looking to revert back to an era where some of their life’s most fond memories were created. And in doing so, bring awareness to those themes that were seemingly lost in time.

So consider this a first class boarding pass onto the 80U train. Our destination? An unexplored location within the fashion universe that grants one wish; an opportunity to, Brand New Your Retro.

For more information on the history of 80’s University, click on the image below. Also, to hear our interview with the Founders of 80U, click on the mixcloud link below.

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Youthful expression in Hip Hop has always been fundamental to the culture. After all, the youth collectively are and have always been responsible for the long-term sustainability and progressiveness of the culture. In a recent conversation, I went on record saying that Hip Hop and I are twins; there are very few recollected moments in my life in which Hip Hop hasn’t been a major fixture.

In this regard, DJ Kool Flash and I are similar. Where we differ however is DJ Kool Flash’s ability to profess her support of the culture [at her present age] in a way that is extremely passionate, expressive, and masterful.

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This week on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio (4/20/2016), D.D. Turner and C. Stats kick it with the talented future legend, DJ Kool Flash. During our time spent with DJ Kool Flash, we discuss her Hip Hop roots, her favorite Hip Hop artists, and equally as exciting and riveting, her introduction and ongoing skill development as a Turntablist. And regarding the playlist? Let’s just say it bridges the musical gap and effectively celebrates those Hip Hop artists that started out young…Like DJ Kool Flash.

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By: D.D. Turner, Founder/Executive Producer/Host
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard
Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard
Chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird! Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to listen to our show archives. And while there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.**

 

In 2000 years from now, it’s reasonable to think that Hip Hop’s story will be contained and accessible in a collection of texts that are as significant as the Bible, the Quran, the Torah, the Tripitaka, and the Vedas. In our sacred Hip Hop text, I foresee the opening sentence reading as follows:

“In the beginning, there was the DJ [or Disc Jockey/Crowd Controller/Cut Master/Mix Master]. For thou extremities, serving as an extension of thine heart and projecting the passions contained within thine soul, controlled the emotion of the crowd, and quelled the collective angst.”

I grant you that my zeal for the Hip Hop DJ is perhaps extreme [and even blasphemous based on the reader] but it is appropriate. Hip Hop culture started with the Disc Jockey. And it would be because of this foundational role, Hip Hop would be conceived and nurtured into the global powerhouse of a culture that so many of us have come to support and love. But like anything else that is nurtured, it inevitably matures and morphs into something that is an exact manifestation of its own hopes and dreams. And that is a refined, highly skilled, and progressed version of its predecessors and younger self.

With certainty, it can be stated that Hip Hop’s DJ Pioneers hoped for the progressiveness of the discipline and absolutely, DJ Rob Swift has contributed to leading the effort of fulfilling these hopes. More than a DJ, Rob Swift is a skilled Turntablist; a musician of sorts whose instrumentation is a result of his skillful and admired manipulation of sound through a carefully crafted and honed technique.

This week on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio, D.D. Turner and stats kicks it with the legendary, DJ Rob Swift. During their park bench-esque conversation, the duo discuss with Rob his DJing roots, growing up in Queens, his foray into academia, and a host of other topics. And because we’re sure of your inquiry about the playlist, we’re proud to announce that it’s ALL ABOUT THE DJ.

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By: D.D. Turner , Founder/Executive Producer/Host
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard
Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard
Mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird! Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to listen to our show archives. And while there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.**

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The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) Radio is deeply saddened by the untimely passing of pioneering lyricist and Hip Hop purveyor, Phife Dawg. So, to appropriately celebrate the life and legacy of our beloved Hip Hop hero, D.D. Turner, Stats, and Mr. Street recorded this show in his honor and memory.

Follow the link below to stream the Phife Dawg Tribute episode/chapter.

Can you recall the moment when you realized that Hip Hop’s sound and look was multi-dimensional? In pondering an answer to this question, our collective recollection as Hip Hop supporters would naturally transport us back to 1988 to engage memories of the endearing Native Tongue movement (Tribe Called Quest, De La Soul, Jungle Brothers, Black Sheep, Queen Latifah, Monie Love, Kool DJ Red Alert, Chi-Ali, and the Fu-Schnickens) and such an engagement would be undeniably correct. But in 1992, Hip Hop’s music would experience an infusion to its already present and unapologetically expressed consciousness. As supporters, we’d have the good fortune of being introduced to a new sound, spirit, and aestheticism that we had yet to experience up until that point. And the provider of this experience you ask? Arrested Development and their debut release, ‘3 Years, 5 Months & 2 Days In The Life Of…

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Arrested Development is legendary. During a time when Hip Hop’s Rap music was already at its multi-dimensional peak, A.D. [Arrested Development] further pushed the music’s boundaries, thereby, creating another realm where the culture could thrive amidst the music business’s time and space construct. Arrested Development effectively reinforced the understanding that gaining and maintaining Knowledge of Self wasn’t the singular responsibility of Black culture; the duty was to also be proud of who we are while upholding an ever-present sense of integrity that is warranted by our African lineage. Additionally, through their soulfully conscious concoctions of melody, A.D. forced us to challenge popular perspective and engage individual thought and perception. After hearing ‘Mr. Wendal,’ how many of you found yourself driven by the inclination to engage a homeless person in dialogue? I did and found the conversation to be extremely enlightening and impactful. From ‘Everyday People’ to ‘Tennessee’ to ‘Revolution’ to Speech’s Hip Hop Proclamation, ‘Can U Hear Me,’ back to the positive cultural assertions that ‘Natural Hair’ imparted to some of the group’s current releases like, ‘Follow That,’ and ‘Weight (Off My Back),’ Arrested Development has always been endowed with a capability of authoring music that connects with the consciousness of humanity without sacrificing Hip Hop’s Boom-Bap signature.

This Wednesday on March 2nd, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio kicks it with Speech, Founder and Front-Man of the legendary Arrested Development collective. With Speech, we discuss growing up in Milwaukee and Tennessee, the formation of Arrested Development, cultural awareness, their new projects, and a host of other topics.

By: D.D. Turner , Founder/Executive Producer/Host – TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio/@HipHops_Wizard

Instagram: @HipHops_Wizard

Mixcloud.com/TCOHHL_Radio

Chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

**You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird. Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview on March 2nd. And while you’re there, subscribe to our station to stay updated on our latest show releases.

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Kendrick ‘K-Dot’ Lamar!

With 11 nominations, it was inevitable. But it’s no secret; Kendrick’s journey to this prestigious moment has been long, steady, and consistent. For those of us that have been fortunate enough to follow his exciting career, collectively we have bore witness to the maturation of a man; a man that overtly proclaims his love for the culture of Hip Hop while remaining aligned with its core principle of bringing awareness to social inequality and disparity. And never has he missed a step while engaging in the discipline of Emceeing.

So, to our revered and celebrated, Kendrick Lamar, The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend (#TCOHHL) congratulates you on your amazing accomplishment. Not only is it well deserved, it serves as a worthy testament of Hip Hop’s power and its ability to transcend cultural and socio-economic differences.

Kendrick ‘K-Dot’ Lamar, standing resolute in the shadow of the legendary, N.W.A., you are an appropriate victor.  Compton, California…Stand the f$@k up!! This is your moment.

– D.D. Turner, Purveyor of Hip Hop Culture
TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio
@TCOHHL_Radio
mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio

How do you celebrate the life and legacy of, Sean Price? In a public forum, preferably one that is broadcasted, you invite his brother and arguably the person, following his immediate family, that knew him best. That would be, the Rock[ness] Monstah (most commonly known by true Hip Hop heads as, ‘Rock’) from one of Hip Hop’s most notable and quotable premier lyrical tag-teams, Heltah Skeltah.

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Next Wednesday, February 17th, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio kicks it with the Rockness Monstah. From life in Brooklyn to his brotherhood with the legendary, Sean Price, to his perspective on the current state of lyricism and music, Rock gives us an interview and discussion that is sure to keep you thoroughly enthralled. As well as, new music that will undoubtedly get you excited about the “Buck-Town” legend’s upcoming project(s).

You know the drill! Don’t be a #Turdbird. Visit mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio to hear the interview. And while you’re there, hit the “Follow” button.

Twitter: @TCOHHL_Radio

Twitter/IG: @HipHops_Wizard

Facebook: The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend

“…these are the words that I manifest. I Manifest.” – Gang Starr, Manifest (No More Mr. Nice Guy, 1989 – Wild Pitch Records/EMI Records)

Peace, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis

With sincerity, I submit this manifesto of gratitude and appreciation for your concern. More to the point and specific to this document’s intent, I thank you for your candor; your willingness to acknowledge the plight of Black people [through your dialogue invoking joint, White Privilege II] and the origination of what has proven to be an insurmountable social obstacle against the system of White Privilege. Your efforts are commendable, and brave to boot. Your public observance of what has been an issue for nearly 500 years is regarded as sincerely empathetic and not trivial, for it suggests that you understand the proper way in which to address and impart reasoning unto your cultural peers for the purpose of contextualizing the very real idea of white privilege, cultural appropriation, and cultural subjugation. However, while your song content and approach are unique and brim with quality, I’d be remiss if I failed to mention that the intent and goal aren’t. As I am sure you are aware, Hip Hop has always served as the initiate for social change, highlighting the adverse circumstances under which we were, are, and continue to be placed, per the ubiquitous nature of white privilege/supremacy.

Over the years, many of our beloved and legendary Emcees have worked to bring awareness to the problem while bolstering the richness and righteousness that is contained within us, the original man – “The maker, the owner, the cream of the planet Earth, Father of civilization, God of the Universe.” Legendary Emcees such as: KRS One – You Must Learn; PRT (Poor Righteous Teachers) – Shakiyla; X-Clan – Funkin’ Lesson; Lakim Shabazz – Black is Back; King Sun – Be Black; Big Daddy Kane – Young, Gifted, and Black ; Brand Nubians – Wake Up; Public Enemy – Fight The Power; Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five – The Message; Fearless Four – Problems of The World Today; Gang Starr – Royalty; Black Star (Mos Def & Talib Kweli) – Brown Skin Lady; Rakim – The Mystery; Nas – I Can, and a host of others that go unnamed but are equally recognized. Unfortunately, the gracious offerings of these artists wouldn’t surpass exposure beyond cultural relevance; the exception perhaps being those White brothers and sisters that were and continue to be avid Hip Hop supporters and/or historians.

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Macklemore and Ryan, the point of the aforementioned is not to convey nor pose opposition to your song, but, to simply acknowledge those that have come before you [as you’ve most notably done on DownTown feat. Kool Moe Dee, Grandmaster Caz, and Grandmaster Melle Mel]and have leveraged the platform of Hip Hop culture as a means of effectuating social change, or in the least, spark the flame of cultural consideration amongst  White folks.

Regarding this matter, I found myself compelled to express my perspective. Not because I felt it necessary to align with the wayward backlash that you guys are being met with, but instead, to provide an articulate and respectful explanation of how we as Black folks potentially feel about your song, albeit gracious. On another note, I have to admit that I was somewhat indifferent about your career; I’d concur that your lyrical prowess is mostly enjoyable and your content/topics were interesting and sometimes even poignant but your songs never quite resonated with me. In fact, if I can be honest, I initially considered you to be just another White rapper using the benefit of implicit privilege, supremacy, carefree themes, flow patterns, suitable vocal inflections, and vocabulary to drive a career. A shift in my belief has since occurred causing me to depart from this perspective and see that in fact, White people can genuinely care about and be invested in the long-term sustainability of Black culture. The two of you have proven this through your public sincerity and gratitude for the incomparable contributions that Black culture has imparted unto the world.  You guys have possibly set the stage for change amongst White people and it is now time to execute.

Below are some recommendations of how you can further facilitate an understanding amongst your ethnic peers regarding the social dynamic between Black and White people and how it is impacted by the system of White Privilege.  Some recommended group talking points amongst White people are as follows:

  • Don’t be threatened by the assertion of Black [and Brown] Pride
  • Seek opportunities that support/reinforce empathy for the Black [and Brown] experience
  • Similarities between the Black and White racial/social experience is virtually non-existent
  • Understand that the statement, “Black Lives Matter” is not suggestive of racism or a disregard for White lives
  • Gentrification is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that forces cultural displacement
  • White flight is a result of White Privilege and is a real and proven concept that erodes the cultural diversity in a neighborhood, thereby, causing the inevitability of poverty as a result of ethnic stereotyping
  • Amongst Black people, Rioting is never a result of animalistic and/or apathetic manifestations. Instead, it is the result of hopelessness in the face of racial adversity, inequality, and injustice
  • Effectively, Black [and Brown] people can’t reasonably be regarded as racist amidst the looming shadows of systematic White Privilege/Supremacy

Again, I thank you [prospective Hip Hop Legends] for your willingness to create the basis upon which healthy dialogue regarding the issue of ethnic privilege will perhaps come to thrive. It is my hope that the perspective shared in this manifesto has merely served as additional context and has imparted suggestive instructions that look to contribute to a foundation of better understanding the Black experience.

Thank you in advance for the engagement. Looking forward to hearing back from you.

One,

D.D. Turner, Enforcer of Negritude

TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio

@TCOHHL_Radio

mixcloud.com/tcohhl_radio

tcohhl.wordpress.com

chroniclesofahiphoplegend.bandcamp.com

 

 

 

 

In Hip Hop context, how would you define the title, Lyricist? Here’s my submission:
Lyricist [liruh-sist] : One whom is endowed with the ability to express popular thought and perception through the skillful execution of rhyme sequences, patterns, and constructs all while adhering to the sacred tenants of Hip Hop culture.

This definition explains [Coney Island] Brooklyn, New York City’s, Torae Carr exquisitely. As a polished Emcee, Torae has committed himself to an undeniable consistency over the years by delivering lyrical craftwork that is replete with formidable punchlines and observations that go straight to the heart, mind, and soul of his fans. And to reinforce the complimentary perceptions of those of us that comprise his loyal fan base, our celebrated TorGuide has blessed us with, Entitled; a full length project that satisfies the expectations of even the most unforgiving Hip Hop music critic. From “Get Down” to “C.I.’s Finest” to the “Shoutro,” Torae takes us on an explorative journey of his own maturation, offering disclosure along the way through his lyrical prowess about his life experiences, love, and loss.

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But to think of Torae as only a lyricist is as absurd as regarding Imhotep as only the High Priest of Heliopolis. Torae’s career also boasts his role as a regular SiriusXM radio show host where his self-titled TorGuide show provides quality Hip Hop programming to the masses. And most recently, he has proven his versatility and discipline yet again by submitting himself to the realm of acting, appearing in the pilot episode of the VH1 feature, The Breaks.

Torea’s interest in disciplines outside of Emceeing is implicit and speaks to the idea of long term career sustainability perhaps being the desire of most Lyricists and Rappers but is only achieved when there is a willingness to explore brand expansion opportunities that go beyond the scope of music; consider the careers of Ice Cube, Will Smith, LL Cool J, Queen Latifah, Ludacris, Ice T, Common, T.I., and Mos Def. And now, Torae.

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Torae has borrowed a page from the golden playbook of our Hip Hop transcending elder statesmen/women by pursuing and mastering fields outside of the culture. And like these legends, his journey of self-exploration and maturation through music has prepared him for the realization of his life’s path. And as he has showed us through his hard work, sacrifice, and determination over the years, he’s not just deserving of all of the good things that are to come for he and his family, he’s Entitled.

-D.D. Turner, Founder – #TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend)

Click the below links to hear our recent interview with Torae:

The “Torae” Chapter (U.S. Version)

The “Torae” Chapter (International Version)

 

 

Art, regardless of the medium, is subjective. When engaging art, individual interpretation affords us the opportunity to derive our own context regarding the inspiration and intent behind the work. Following this reasoning, one can appropriately deduce that, fundamentally Hip Hop provides the canvas of expression and the interpretive standards to which we adhere for the purpose of making a connection with its masterpieces. From Rap music to Graffiti to the pursuit of knowledge through education [institutional or otherwise], those of us that regard the culture’s elements as regular functions of our day-to-day lives generally do so in a manner that fits perfectly into the framework of our own individualism.

Introducing, Dan Lish; a consummate example of the aforementioned and a certified endorser of Hip Hop culture. As a talented visual artist and an ardent supporter of Hip Hop, Dan has proven that a place of mutuality can exist between two disciplines and the regular hampering of inhibition can be achieved when creativity and passion are always prioritized.

Real talk…Dan’s work is f@%king outstanding! Albeit a result of his individualism, Dan’s ability to visually interpret song content and the persona of some of Hip Hop’s most revered legends is inspiring, thought provoking, and surely endowed with the capacity to beckon intelligent and perspective driven Hip Hop conversation. To study his work is to submit to a realm of wonderment; forcing escapism to a magical destination where the cost of admission is limited to the mere engagement of subjectivity by one’s own interpretation. His choice of subtle colors and illustrative processes makes for a style that is completely his own; it allows those that indulge his masterpieces to not be lost in the over-saturation and blinding hues of bright colors. But instead, you find yourself swept away by Dan’s exertion of identified symbolism and its ability to portray the genius, iconic nature, and perhaps the interpreted innocence of our beloved Hip Hop legends.

Hip Hop has grown and its maturity is a mirror reflection of the intellect, skill, and creativity that it has fostered in us as its supporters. Consistently, Dan Lish provides evidence of this by allowing the synergy that exists between his life gift of intellect, skill, and creativity and his passion for Hip Hop in an effort to widen the culture’s perspective and further its social appeal and global relevance.

Visit http://www.egotripland.com/artist-dan-lish/ and http://danlish.com to see Dan’s artwork. Also, stay tuned for the upcoming “Dan Lish Episode” on TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend) Radio (http://mixcloud.com/TCOHHL_Radio).

-D.D. Turner, TCOHHL (The Chronicles of a Hip Hop Legend)

@TCOHHL_Radio – Twitter

@hiphops_wizard – Instagram